A citation-based method for searching scientific literature

G Wallis, H H Bülthoff. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2001
Times Cited: 121







List of co-cited articles
645 articles co-cited >1



Times Cited
  Times     Co-cited
Similarity


'Breaking' position-invariant object recognition.
David D Cox, Philip Meier, Nadja Oertelt, James J DiCarlo. Nat Neurosci 2005
93
43


Learning Invariance from Transformation Sequences.
Peter Földiák. Neural Comput 1991
244
33



Hierarchical models of object recognition in cortex.
M Riesenhuber, T Poggio. Nat Neurosci 1999
24

Slow feature analysis: unsupervised learning of invariances.
Laurenz Wiskott, Terrence J Sejnowski. Neural Comput 2002
217
24


Shape representation in the inferior temporal cortex of monkeys.
N K Logothetis, J Pauls, T Poggio. Curr Biol 1995
542
22



Impact of learning on representation of parts and wholes in monkey inferotemporal cortex.
Chris I Baker, Marlene Behrmann, Carl R Olson. Nat Neurosci 2002
214
17

Fast readout of object identity from macaque inferior temporal cortex.
Chou P Hung, Gabriel Kreiman, Tomaso Poggio, James J DiCarlo. Science 2005
456
17

How does the brain solve visual object recognition?
James J DiCarlo, Davide Zoccolan, Nicole C Rust. Neuron 2012
593
17

Learning to recognize objects.
Wallis, Bülthoff. Trends Cogn Sci 1999
65
24

Learning illumination- and orientation-invariant representations of objects through temporal association.
Guy Wallis, Benjamin T Backus, Michael Langer, Gesche Huebner, Heinrich Bülthoff. J Vis 2009
23
69



The Psychophysics Toolbox.
D H Brainard. Spat Vis 1997
14

Recognizing depth-rotated objects: evidence and conditions for three-dimensional viewpoint invariance.
I Biederman, P C Gerhardstein. J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 1993
357
14

Rotation direction affects object recognition.
Quoc C Vuong, Michael J Tarr. Vision Res 2004
38
36

Untangling invariant object recognition.
James J DiCarlo, David D Cox. Trends Cogn Sci 2007
380
14

Models of object recognition.
M Riesenhuber, T Poggio. Nat Neurosci 2000
306
14


The use of facial motion and facial form during the processing of identity.
Barbara Knappmeyer, Ian M Thornton, Heinrich H Bülthoff. Vision Res 2003
103
13



Visual object recognition.
N K Logothetis, D L Sheinberg. Annu Rev Neurosci 1996
627
12

Inferotemporal cortex and object vision.
K Tanaka. Annu Rev Neurosci 1996
833
12

Prior experience of rotation is not required for recognizing objects seen from different angles.
Gang Wang, Shinji Obama, Wakayo Yamashita, Tadashi Sugihara, Keiji Tanaka. Nat Neurosci 2005
30
40








Unsupervised learning of visual features through spike timing dependent plasticity.
Timothée Masquelier, Simon J Thorpe. PLoS Comput Biol 2007
145
11


Recognizing moving faces: a psychological and neural synthesis.
Alice J. O'Toole, Dana A. Roark, Hervé Abdi. Trends Cogn Sci 2002
201
11


Three-dimensional object recognition is viewpoint dependent.
M J Tarr, P Williams, W G Hayward, I Gauthier. Nat Neurosci 1998
129
11

Invariant visual representation by single neurons in the human brain.
R Quian Quiroga, L Reddy, G Kreiman, C Koch, I Fried. Nature 2005
749
10

Speed of processing in the human visual system.
S Thorpe, D Fize, C Marlot. Nature 1996
10



A model of the ventral visual system based on temporal stability and local memory.
Reto Wyss, Peter König, Paul F M J Verschure. PLoS Biol 2006
62
16

Why is real-world visual object recognition hard?
Nicolas Pinto, David D Cox, James J DiCarlo. PLoS Comput Biol 2008
120
10

Learning and disrupting invariance in visual recognition with a temporal association rule.
Leyla Isik, Joel Z Leibo, Tomaso Poggio. Front Comput Neurosci 2012
20
50

Performance-optimized hierarchical models predict neural responses in higher visual cortex.
Daniel L K Yamins, Ha Hong, Charles F Cadieu, Ethan A Solomon, Darren Seibert, James J DiCarlo. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2014
530
10


Co-cited is the co-citation frequency, indicating how many articles cite the article together with the query article. Similarity is the co-citation as percentage of the times cited of the query article or the article in the search results, whichever is the lowest. These numbers are calculated for the last 100 citations when articles are cited more than 100 times.