A citation-based method for searching scientific literature

Thomas C Toppino. Percept Psychophys 2003
Times Cited: 80







List of co-cited articles
984 articles co-cited >1



Times Cited
  Times     Co-cited
Similarity




Voluntary control and the dynamics of perceptual bi-stability.
R van Ee, L C J van Dam, G J Brouwer. Vision Res 2005
130
42

Multistable phenomena: changing views in perception.
Leopold, Logothetis. Trends Cogn Sci 1999
449
38

Visual competition.
Randolph Blake, Nikos K Logothetis. Nat Rev Neurosci 2002
800
32


Voluntary control of reversible figures.
R M Liebert, B Burk. Percept Mot Skills 1985
36
61

Stable perception of visually ambiguous patterns.
David A Leopold, Melanie Wilke, Alexander Maier, Nikos K Logothetis. Nat Neurosci 2002
264
25

Why do ambiguous figures reverse?
I Rock, S Hall, J Davis. Acta Psychol (Amst) 1994
56
33

Acceleration of reversals of a Necker cube.
L H Pelton, C M Solley. Am J Psychol 1968
45
37

Neural correlates of perceptual rivalry in the human brain.
E D Lumer, K J Friston, G Rees. Science 1998
491
20


Human brain activity during spontaneously reversing perception of ambiguous figures.
A Kleinschmidt, C Büchel, S Zeki, R S Frackowiak. Proc Biol Sci 1998
209
20

Multistable perception: when bottom-up and top-down coincide.
Jürgen Kornmeier, Christine Maira Hein, Michael Bach. Brain Cogn 2009
44
36

What is rivalling during binocular rivalry?
N K Logothetis, D A Leopold, D L Sheinberg. Nature 1996
370
18






Prime time: fatigue and set effects in the perception of reversible figures.
G M Long, T C Toppino, G W Mondin. Percept Psychophys 1992
73
19


Endogenous attention prolongs dominance durations in binocular rivalry.
Sang Chul Chong, Duje Tadin, Randolph Blake. J Vis 2005
114
17

Visual fixation points and depth perception.
N Kawabata, K Yamagami, M Noaki. Vision Res 1978
36
36

Binocular rivalry and visual awareness in human extrastriate cortex.
F Tong, K Nakayama, J T Vaughan, N Kanwisher. Neuron 1998
514
16



Directing spatial attention within an object: altering the functional equivalence of shape descriptions.
Mary A Peterson, Bradley S Gibson. J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 1991
51
25

Neuronal correlates of subjective visual perception.
N K Logothetis, J D Schall. Science 1989
366
16





The role of frequency in developing perceptual sets.
B R BUGELSKI, D A ALAMPAY. Can J Psychol 1961
44
27

Computational evidence for a rivalry hierarchy in vision.
Hugh R Wilson. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2003
267
15

Reversal time distribution in the perception of visual ambiguous stimuli.
A Borsellino, A De Marco, A Allazetta, S Rinesi, B Bartolini. Kybernetik 1972
135
15

Are switches in perception of the Necker cube related to eye position?
Wolfgang Einhäuser, Kevan A C Martin, Peter König. Eur J Neurosci 2004
35
34


Attention speeds binocular rivalry.
Chris L E Paffen, David Alais, Frans A J Verstraten. Psychol Sci 2006
98
15

Eye movements during the viewing of Necker cubes.
S R Ellis, L Stark. Perception 1978
54
20

Multistability in perception.
F Attneave. Sci Am 1971
174
13



Early interactions between neuronal adaptation and voluntary control determine perceptual choices in bistable vision.
P C Klink, R van Ee, M M Nijs, G J Brouwer, A J Noest, R J A van Wezel. J Vis 2008
71
15



Timing and competition in networks representing ambiguous figures.
C Gómez, E D Argandoña, R G Solier, J C Angulo, M Vázquez. Brain Cogn 1995
40
25

As the cube turns: evidence for two processes in the perception of a dynamic reversible figure.
G M Long, T C Toppino, J F Kostenbauder. Percept Psychophys 1983
43
23

Object-based attention determines dominance in binocular rivalry.
Jude F Mitchell, Gene R Stoner, John H Reynolds. Nature 2004
158
12

Distributions of alternation rates in various forms of bistable perception.
Jan W Brascamp, Raymond van Ee, Wiebe R Pestman, Albert V van den Berg. J Vis 2005
85
12


Co-cited is the co-citation frequency, indicating how many articles cite the article together with the query article. Similarity is the co-citation as percentage of the times cited of the query article or the article in the search results, whichever is the lowest. These numbers are calculated for the last 100 citations when articles are cited more than 100 times.